European painting

Americans can paint (when they put their mind to it)

Thyssen - Street in Nassau

At first, the Old Masters collection of Thyssen-Boremisza in Madrid disappoints.  It can hardly do otherwise:  the expectations set up by the famous pieces they hold — a Claude, two Bronzinos, a Velvet Breughel, a Carpaccio — are so very high.  But the collection suffers from the “late-arrival” syndrome:  by the time collection-gathering swung into full tilt, the best pieces had already been permanently taken off the market: as a result, with the exception of the handful famous pieces everyone already knows about, T-B is full of minor masters, and very minor works by the great masters, and even minorer ones only attributed to them — usually not very convincingly.  (It’s supposed to have an important post 1900-collection, but how on earth would I know anything about that?)

The museum does contain a wonderful surprise, however: a large collection of late 19th century American academic landscapes — which are very good indeed.  If it weren’t for the topics, you’d swear these were 17th century Dutch.  This is perhaps the greatest pleasure one can experience in a museum:  to discover something completely new and unheard of.

Thank you, Miss T.

PS. If, like me, you are new to this world, here are a few names for you:  William Bradford , John Frederick Kensett , Frederic Edwin Church , Albert Bierstadt , William Trost Richards.

Thyssen - Trout catchers

thyssen - morgenstern

Thyssen - tropical landscape

Thyssen - Blue Ridge

Thyssen - Nicaragua

Thyssen - Labrador

Seaside with lighhouse

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Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Center Panel

This topic consists of three posts:

Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Left Panel

Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Right Panel
Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Center Panel


Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Right Panel

This topic consists of three posts:

This topic consists of three posts:

Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Left Panel

Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Right Panel
Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Center Panel


Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Left Panel

Not my favorite picture at Lisbon’s Museu de Arte Antiga, but certainly her greatest crowd-pleaser. It took a rare combo of consideration and pushiness to photograph this thing.

This topic consists of three posts:

Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Left Panel

Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Right Panel
Bosch — Temptation of Saint Anthony, Center Panel

 


More concering the female ankle — or what Evolutionary Psychologists and Aesthetic Theorists could learn from Marketing Research

Part 2 of 3

[With Sir C’s forebearance]

This research paper says ankles are among the body features least paid attention to by potential sexual partners. Like all such papers by evolutionary psychologists, it fails to address the question no marketing researcher would ever overlook: does the aggregate data in fact obstruct the structure of the phenomenon (“market”)? That is to say, does aesthetic interest in ankles define a certain population — one among whom the ankle is a significant item? (Perhaps even “the most significant”?).

This writer’s self-observation suggests: yes.

If so, then comes the crunch question: if so, then what else is unique about this sub-group? Surely, they are not all balding six-foot-five, paper-skinned descendants of East European gentry with a strong interest in martial arts, European opera, glazed pottery, and Japanese classics? And if not — are there any features they share? And significantly: not just taste features — i.e. “all ankle lovers prefer blonds” (clearly not true)– but “do all ankle-lovers have ankles themselves?” or: “do all ankle-lovers happen to have an extra-long middle finger in the right hand?”) The marketer will also want to know — I should say chiefly want to know — how to reach them — what media they watch, what magazines they read, etc.

Can you see what I am driving at? Taste as a hidden structure of humanity!

In my view, Evolutionary Psychologists, like aestheticists (and all academics in general), would benefit greatly from a course or two in marketing research. For instance, publications of the World Coffee Council would teach them that:

a) the entire coffee-drinker population in the world can be divided into several very specific groups (fewer than ten) — with respect to the particular coffee flavor each group prefers;

b) that members of those groups are found all over the world — but not evenly; they are in fact spread lumpily: for instance, the preference for a coffee taste described by professional tasters as “burnt rubber” shows up all over the globe, even in (still) mostly coffee-less China, but is a significant plurality in only two nations on earth: Poland and the UK (strong stuff, eh?); not the majority, mind you, as in “50% +1”; but significant plurality, meaning the largest of the many minorities, one usually large enough to dictate its tastes to others (it determines what gets put on supermarket shelves);

c) each such group consists, in different proportions, of a hard-core (can’t sell them a milky cappucino if their life depended on it) ; and hangers on (can drink any coffee, generally prefer burnt rubber, but happy to try whatever everyone else is having at the moment); the hangers on can be sold a different product, the hard-core — only once;

d) the special gifts required to make a coffee-taster (a natural gift is required followed by intensive training) disqualify a person from telling you what they like: people who have tasted a great deal of coffee often can’t make up their mind and, in private, actually turn out to be tea- or juice-drinkers; or else consume such a wide variety of coffees that they do not fall into any of the broad categories themselves; in other words, the process of training an expert, both sharpens ones taste and, in a sense, ruins it.

It is my hunch, based on years of conducting marketing research, that not only does the taste in ankles, but the tastes in opera and painting and architecture run the same way: many islands of mutually incompatible, probably hard-wired taste-preferences (“Ankles!” “Boobs!”); and between them a sea of hangers on, who happen to say they like X because their mother did, or their girlfriend does, and have some familiarity with it and some sentiment for it, but who really don’t have anything that could be called taste of their own (“I used to like candy but now like booze”); and swimming within this sea: “experts” — near-omnivores, seeing everything, baffled by it all, and never understood by anyone else who cannot imagine what it is like to know more than they do.